Friday, September 29, 2006

other people's books

There is a wonderful article written by Jay Parini, D. E. Axinn Professor of English & Creative Writing at Middlebury College (in Vermont, USA) other people's books and in particular, their personal libraries.

What interests me about other people's books is the nature of their collection. A personal library is an X-ray of the owner's soul. It offers keys to a particular temperament, an intellectual disposition, a way of being in the world. Even how the books are arranged on the shelves deserves notice, even reflection. There is probably no such thing as complete chaos in such arrangements.

You can read more in - The Chronicle Review of 22 September 2006.

My human told me that he totally agrees. A few years ago, he had the opportunity to check out the late Professor Manning Clark's upstairs study with its huge collection of books. Manning Clark was Australia's foremost historian and wrote a massive definitive six-volume History of Australia. My human said that Manning Clark's collection of Russian literature (in original Russian) was fascinating and so was the house itself.

Unfortunately, the small collection of books in my house only number between 1200 and 1500 (they have not been counted recently) which is insufficient to constitute a personal library. Hmmm, I haven't been read to for some time...

*For more kitty thoughts, check out Camilla.

.........ooooooooOOOOOOOOoooooooo..........

I refused to eat anymore chicken this morning so my human had to give me some of the tinned salmon that he was putting in his sandwich to take to work. Then I went back to having a nap.

My human returned home from work earlier today. Woohoo! I had chicken for dinner and went back to having a nap and my human had disappeared when I looked up. He was back two hours later just in time for me to resume eating my dinner. It seems he went to Neil's birthday party but thankfully his priority was returning home to cuddle me! Meow!

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